GRASP – REDD+ Mapping Project

GRASP – REDD+ Mapping Project

GRASP Activity Details

Project Launch Title: GRASP – REDD+ Mapping Project

Date of Completion: 2016-04-14

This is a web-based tool that superimposes maps of valuable underground carbon stocks with great ape distribution in Africa and Asia – thereby making the strongest possible argument for protecting both – was launched this week in Monrovia, Liberia, by the Great Apes Survival Partnership (GRASP) and the United Nations Collaborative Programme for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (UN-REDD Programme).

The GRASP – REDD+ Mapping Project was introduced at the GRASP Regional Meeting – West Africa, which brought together partners from nine West African countries to discuss key conservation issues in the region.

The GRASP – REDD+ Mapping Project is designed to identify priority areas for implementing REDD projects when also considering co-benefits for the conservation of great apes. The maps are designed to help decision-makers, climate specialists and conservation organizations access data and link the carbon and great ape layers with other context data.

GRASP and UN-REDD worked with the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology to develop the on-line tool, which can be accessed through the Ape Populations, Environments and Surveys (A.P.E.S.) database, a web-based decision support system.

Click image to Use map tool

 GRASP – REDD+ Mapping Project

or visit

http://primatdbext.eva.mpg.de/redd/

 

 

 

 

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Great Apes, Ebola and Vaccinations: Webcast Episode 06

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Organized Crime in Wildlife Further Fuels Conflict in Eastern DR Congo

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30th Apr 2015 Home, Press Releases

Organized crime and the illegal trade in natural resources continues to increasingly fuel the conflict in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DR Congo) , according to a new report from the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and partners.

The Government of DR Congo, supported by the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO) – the largest UN peacekeeping mission with 20,000 uniformed personnel – is confronting not only a political insurgency but an increasing number of illegal operations conducted by militarized criminal groups with transnational links involved in large-scale smuggling and laundering of natural resources.

Is Bushmeat Sustainable? U.N. Study Says ‘Possible’

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16th Oct 2011 Press Releases

A United Nations report says sustainable bushmeat harvesting is possible, but only if governments combine new mechanisms for monitoring and law enforcement with new management models, such as community-based management or game-ranching. Finding alternate means of livelihood for residents of forests and other wild lands also will help conserve vanishing species.

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The report, “Livelihood Alternatives for the Unsustainable Use of Bushmeat,” was prepared for the Bushmeat Liaison Group of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), with assistance from the wildlife trade monitoring network TRAFFIC and financial support from the European Union.

Download Report [PDF, 1mb]

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13th Jun 2011 Press Releases

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